Photo Essay: Maisons-Laffitte Parc Thoughout The Year

maisons-laffitte, france

You have to imagine the Parc de Maisons-Laffitte like an oasis in the concrete jungle of the Paris suburbs; an oasis to not simply stroll, picnic or play in — it’s an oasis to live in. Therefore, its preservation must be ensured.

A municipal association is deciding about each single construction project that could change the look of the park. You want a larger garage? Get the association to approve. You want to build a house? Get the association to approve (tough one!). You want to open a shop or restaurant? Deal with the immediate rejection. There are no commercial buildings in the Parc de Maisons-Laffitte, despite of its size: 7km². The park makes up for 60% of the surface of Maisons-Laffitte, while 40% of the city’s inhabitants live there.

Those 60% of Maisons-Laffite are a haven for castle lovers and horses (they have priority at all times and even better walkways than pedestrians do). The park is wild, lush, full of trees and birds (I have seen parakeets here) and undergoes an ever changing floral look. Maisons-Laffitte Parc is a great place to be for nature lovers, who seek a remote spot for living while being only a 20 minutes train ride away from Paris.

Spring

Summer

Autumn

Winter

Have a look at this city map, which puts the size of the Parc de Maisons-Laffitte into better perspective.

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Weekend Wanderings: Paris Flood #CrueParis

It’s been confirmed: The Paris flood had reached its peak last weekend and is now receding. Phew! The city of lights and love is (for now) no longer facing a new “flood of the century” like in 1910.

Over the past days, the hashtag #CrueParis (crue = French for flood) has been trending on Twitter. With the Louvre and Musée d’Orsay closed, the Seine suddenly became the biggest tourist attraction despite of the lack of the popular boat shuttles.

I had a closer look myself between Pont Neuf and Pont de la Concorde:

While the Seine did not burst its banks in the centre of Paris, it did in the capital’s suburbs. These photos have been taken in Maisons-Laffitte, a 30 minutes train ride from Paris’ centre to the North West:

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Weekend Wanderings: Tulips Galore, Holland

keukenhof-holland-tulips16

Flower carpets near Keukenhof, Holland

Each year, between March and May, the western coast of the Netherlands is like a bazaar for brightly coloured blossom carpets. Just admit it already; you simply want to sit down, stare, sniff or swim through this sea of spring, don’t you? I do!

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Solitude

solitude

The quieter you become, the more you can hear.
~Ram Dass

Photo details (please click on the image for best quality):
Canon EOS 60D, 31mm, ISO 1000, F9, 1/640 sec.
Location: Lake Rotopounamu, Tongariro NP, New Zealand.

Please watch the video below if you are curious what you can actually hear in the forest surrounding this lake:

If you like this post please have a look at more Wise Words And Quotes In Images

Weekend Wanderings: Sunset Hour At St Leu d’Esserent

Equipped with my brand new travel lens I headed out last weekend for a photo session in a small community in the French Oise region

What I like most about my new Sigma lens is its large zoom (18-300 mm). While one may argue that this results in lower light sensitivity and vignetting, I am intrigued by another bonus: the weight of my camera bag. I now can travel with one lens only and don’t need a complete set (which can be tedious to carry on some hikes).

What travel photographer type are you?
Do you take one or several lenses?
Do you take the time to exchange lenses on different locations?
And how much time do you take for post-processing your travel shots? (I am becoming more and more fan of working on my photos on my iPad using either Snapseed or Lightroom Mobile)

Anyhow, I am glad to announce that my new travel lens passed its first test in the narrow alleys of Saint Leu d’Esserent during the blue hour:

st-leu-desserent-street2st-leu-desserent-street st-leu-desserent-sunset3st-leu-desserent-abbey2 st-leu-desserent-abbey1st-leu-desserent-sunset st-leu-desserent-sunset2

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Dangerous Winter Wonderland

Before blogging about the first signs of spring I would like to share some winter photos with you that I took in Germany last year. They depict a weather phenomenon, which is both beautiful and dangerous at once.

Fichtelberg ski lift Germany

Frozen ski lift on the Fichtelberg, the highest peak of the German Erzgebirge

In December, Saxony’s low mountain range (Erzgebirge, East Germany) was wrapped into thick fog layers lasting for weeks. The high air humidity coming along with the fog covered the region’s trees with hoar frost, which built up to a 30 to 40 cm thick ice crust. Needless to say that trees snapped off like matches under the heavy weight.

To avoid accidents, local public services decided to impose a ban to enter the forest above 800 metres. Streets were blocked for days and ski lifts had to shut down when some tree branches threatened to fall on the ropes.

Once streets reopened, we wanted to have a closer look at this newly created winter wonderland and went on a day trip to the highest point of the German Erzgebirge, the Fichtelberg (1,215 m), which looked as stunning as I had never seen it before. Me and my camera(s) got all excited; I could have easily spent the day looking at the most bizarre ice formations, but the cold…the severe cold…

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Photo Essay: Queensland, Australia

As we travelled from Cairns to Brisbane (North to South) we discovered that Queensland is much more than sunny beaches, surfers and adventure parks. There are also endless stretches of straight boring roads, millions of acres of sugar cane and in between — these treasures…

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