Exploring A Tiny Part Of The Great Barrier Reef With The GoPro

Snorkeling the Outer Reef of Cairns gave us a tiny glimpse into an uncomparable underwater universe. Our goal that day was to see a sea turtle; we were lucky enough to swim with one. We hope to be back one day!

Please excuse the camera shake. We actually went out several kilometres to get to the Outer Reef. Big waves were rolling in right behind the corals, making quiet snorkeling almost impossible ;)

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Exploring Rarotonga’s Lagoon With The GoPro

[Please click on the Play buttons to view the videos]
1: In the middle of a shoal; literally surrounded by hundreds of goldband fusiliers.

2: Scissor-tail sergeants and butterflyfish circling around me while I was standing in the lagoon, water till the belly button.

3. Curious damselfish attacking my GoPro. The video is a bit shaky because this really made me laugh :)

4: Enjoying the wide frame of the fisheye lens for GoPro selfies during our island roundtrip on the scooter, and while exploring the lagoon by kayak, paddleboard or while snorkeling.

5: This is a slightly longer version of the three videos above including some additional footage of a parrotfish, a pipefish and an impression of how it looks like under water when the sun hits the surface.

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Weekend Wanderings: Kelly Tarlton’s Sea Life Aquarium

I can’t recall how often I drove past Kelly Tarlton’s ever since I moved to Auckland. Last week I finally went inside the Aquarium for the very first time. Now I can’t recall what took me so long; what a lovely little place!

OK, it’s not the most convenient place for photographers. It’s much easier to capture the sea in the sun instead of moving animals in low light. I actually had to up the ISO to 6,400 for most of the photos below. Yikes.

And I reached a moment when I completely gave up the happy snapping. Me in low light on a conveyor belt leading through the shark tunnel full of moving fish…you get the idea.

A few fun facts: Kelly Tarlton’s aquarium…

  • …is the only in the world where you can see spiny sea horses
  • …is home to New Zealand’s only colony of Antarctic penguins
  • …has been build into former sewage storage tanks of the city

For more fun facts and information about each of the photographed animals please click on the images and read their captions.

If you wonder about the name: Kelly Tarlton was a New Zealand marine archeologist and diver who wanted to make the wonders of the under water world more accessible to the public. Tragically he died only 2 months after the aquarium opened in 1985.

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